Mariapark in Sittard: “Round Trip Netherlands” gets its second wind.


Several weeks ago we dismantled our exhibit in Münster (see below) and now we’ve just built it back up in Sittard in a very different location. The very secular exhibition has gone to a remarkably godly place: in the cloister of the Mariapark in Sittard, which contains some of the most stunning examples of 19th century religious architecture and sculpture in the Netherlands. So after 2 days of hard work on the exhibit about the Dutch annexation of German territory after the War, we were filled with an extasis of a different Passion altogether. Not to diminish the pain of Dutch occupation, but the stations of the cross at the Mariapark are hard to outdo in suffering. It also offered some interesting contrasts and disconnections, as if Jesus of Nazareth was looking out from under the weight of his cross saying, “Suck on that, whiners”.

For images of the show as it was first exhibited in Münster, Germany see the album on that subject.

Thanks to Manuéla Friedrich for spearheading this whole project and for persevering when the prospect of ever getting this show off the ground looked increasingly bleak, and to Studio Louter for production.

Amsterdam GVB Streetcar now rolling with our designs on it.

With all the commotion around the opening of “Temporal Tower” we almost forgot that there was an Amsterdam tram (streetcar) of the GVB (Municipal Transport Company) about to roll out with our name on it. And sure enough, there she is.  Dirk Bertels of Studio Louter and Todd van Hulzen worked together on the concept, which is part of the marketing and sponsorship between the GVB and the Amsterdam Light Festival. But Dirk did all of the actual hard work, Todd just stood back and watched and gave self-evident advice. What looks like a white sticker is actually light-reflective film that lights up when directly lit by traffic lights. We settled on light-reflective film after a long search for materials, from glow-in-the-dark to holographic foil. Now that it’s going to be on the rails, we are curious to see if it will make an impression. But our names are printed on it, and that’s what we’re the most proud of. On the rear is a section of illustration dedicated to the Temporal Tower. You can see the scaffolding. Let us know if you see it around.

The Haringpakkerstoren “rebuilt” in scaffolding and light

compositeWe can’t describe how giddy and proud we are of our new big baby, the impressive reconstruction of the historic Haringpakkerstoren (Herring Packers’ Tower).  Of course our tower is not made of masonry and wood, but of scaffolding, mesh, and most importantly, light.  30 meters high (100 feet), the tower, which we call “Temporal Tower” rises up along the quays of the old harbor of Amsterdam, adjacent to the Central Station and is lit by 36 LED arrays dispersed around the spire.  The light is very gradually animated in something of a churning cycle of one color group.  Each week we will change the color scheme and configuration.  For more information on the history of this tower, the original of which was demolished in 1829, see some of the entries below.  For now we just want to publish some of the most recent photo’s of this little giant. There are more to come, as the project is getting quite a lot of media attention. Continue reading

The Making of “Temporal Tower”

Here are some pictures of our tower project in the making.  The first step was agreeing on a budget and a technical design, which we ploddingly accomplished with our world-class international scaffolder StageCo.  Then with the help of a crane, postponed several days due to a fierce storm, we hoisted the sections which we had built at street level into position.  After that came the mesh wrap.  We were already pretty charmed by the pictures of the tower with only scaffolding and no wrapping.  Now the story is complete, but we secretly long for the purity of the scaffolding on its own.  What do you thinnk?

And here is a video interview I did, explaining the concept in the early stages:

 

Finally a National History Museum at the National Archives: a sustainable festival of the Past.

 

Anne-Reitsmacollage

Photo Anne Reitsma

After three years of hard work, the Geheugenpaleis (Palace of Memory) has come to completion. This project represents the crowning achievement of not only our studio, but of the long term ambitions of the National Archives itself. It is grand, evocative, fascinating, touching and above all it offers deep immersion into the stuff of archives and the stuff of history. T. van Hulzen Design and Studio Louter were engaged from the early beginnings to help forge a sound program, a gripping concept and a cohesive design. We’ve conceived a Memory Palace like no other, which like Bluebeard’s castle offers mysteries behind every door, a world of history in every archival box. 11  uniquely decorated chambers, enlivened by 11 creative installations (music, documentary, video, radio-show, etc.) surround a central “courtyard” allowing for that “a la carte” feel that festivals have. Every room has a unique experience and a unique interpretation of the material, but it is all tied into the history and the utility of the Archive itself.

From a design point of view, we are particularly proud of our all-cardboard “fortress”—this for all the physical qualities that paper and card have to offer: warmth, acoustics, recyclability, and sustainability.  Never have we created so much volume with so little mass. An exhibition of 800 square meters was virtually carted in on two pallets of stacked and folded cardboard boxes. This cardboard, supplied by IHC interior builders, is recycled and emission free. And after the exhibition is retired at the end of 2014 the whole exhibit will be sent to the recycler yet again, to be chipped, separated, and reprocessed. This is a stark difference with the conventional waste created by an exhibition made of wood, plywood, plaster and paint. And with the exception of the printed information panels, all our color is created with the use of filtered LEDs; so no paint required.

Yet not only is our cardboard solution particularly sustainable, it looks remarkable too. The cardboard carries one of the central tropes of the exhibition: a memory palace created of stacked archival boxes, a kind of dream-idea of the Past, made concrete, as if you are walking through Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities or one of Borges’ fantasy libraries. By stacking hundreds of boxes in an oblique bond, we create patterns that catch the colored light in continuously changing waves. Continue reading

New NEMO project for 2014

NEMO

Amsterdam Science Center NEMO has accorded us (T. van Hulzen Design and Studio Louter) their latest contract for the concept, production and design of an all new addition to the permanent display.  The subject is mathematics and geometry in all its facets.  We will touch on pure mathematics, but also on platonic solids, perspective, fractalization, and even proportion and aesthetics.  The concept is “Meetland” or “Measureland”, and our aim is to create a whole world, with streets and buildings and landscapes all of measurable surfaces, all reducible to pure mathematics.  This will be our big project for 2014 and should open at the end of the year.  Keep posted!

 

King Willem-Alexander to open Het Geheugenpaleis in the Hague

The folks down at the National Archive in the Hague are pretty excited about the news that our new king, Willem-Alexander, will be opening their inaugural exhibition in the Hague on Tuesday, October 15.  He will actually be opening the entire newly renovated visitors’ area, including a new study hall, information center, laboratory and workshop for school groups.  On top of this the new exhibitions hall will contain our one-of-a-kind exhibit, Het Geheugenpaleis.  And I’ll be there to give him a hand… or was it a courtsey?

Our invitations are ready!

http://www.gahetna.nl/actueel/pers/2013/zijne-majesteit-koning-willem-alexander-opent-nieuwe-publiekscentrum-nationaal-arc

The National Archives’ Palace of Memory approaches its high point: opening 15 October

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

We are beyond excited about the progress we are making down at the National Archives in The Hague. For their inaugural exhibit we are creating a kind of cardboard fortress, or palace, that houses a number of rooms filled with intriguing stories. The palace of memory works with the concept: the past is a foreign country, and treats each of eleven core stories as relais from ambassadors from the past. Each story is told by a single artist or artists’ collective. We have the story of the last hours of Johan van Oldenbarnevelt, the great 17th century statesman. We have the heartbreaking story of the road to making divorce legal in the Netherlands. There’s the story of a medieval convent, of a slave-trading scoundrel, of the founders of the E.U., of female stowaways on East India Company ships, and more.

But mostly we are just proud of the design-work and the production, and with our partners Studio Louter we are terrifically excited about the multimedia applications and the projection mapping. The lighting expertise of Tinus Holthuis brings our vision to completion.

Het Nationaal Archief: Het Geheugenpaleis
Opening general public 17 October
Prins Willem Alexanderhof 20
2595 BE Den Haag

Archival Material on Hendrick de Keyser

For our current project for the Amsterdam Light Festival we are recreating —after a fashion—one of the vanished renaissance clock-towers of Hendrick de Keyser: the Haringpakkerstoren.  One of the foundation principles of the project is the knowledge that De Keyser is under-appreciated and deserves to be brought into the limelight, as it were. Never the less there is a decent amount of archival material available, either in the image-bank at the Amsterdam city archives (Beeldbank Stadsarchief) or in other archives around Europe.  We’ve found detailed construction plans, paintings from various eras and biographical information on De Keyser himself.  Here’s a collection of things we’ve found, mostly pertaining to the Haringpakkerstoren.   Enjoy.

 

 

Telegraaf devotes article to Temporal Tower

 

Telegraaf_10-09-2013

“American Light Artist” is what the national daily De Telegraaf called Todd van Hulzen. The newspaper is above all interested in the political aspect of the project, which touches on a sensitive subject for the city. In 2005 plans to rebuild the original Haringpakkerstoren (Herring packers tower) were scuttled when the monuments commission declared that the project was theoretically unsound (read: nostalgic) and possibly put the city’s eligibility in danger for its appellation as a UNESCO World Heritage site. This in spite of the fact that the funds to rebuild the tower had already been secured, and that it was a gift to the city from the Foundation Stadsherstel.
Former borough commissioner Guido Frankfurther said “Maak je borst maar nat”, which means, prepare yourself, referring to a lot of anticipated publicity.

Amsterdam Light Festival: Todd van Hulzen creates “Temporal Tower”

TemporalTower2_ToddvanHulzen_copyrightA lot has happened in the last few months, and we’ve been missing the chance to update. One of the most significant things is the fact that Todd van Hulzen was selected, with Studio Louter, to produce their concept for the Amsterdam Light Festival. This is a new annual festival of light art in the capital and we’ve come up with a plan that was compelling enough that it came out on top of the jury’s selection list. It’s called Temporal Tower, and it’s both and homage to one of the vanished clock-towers of the Amsterdam architect Hendrik de Keyser, and also an exploration of the place of monuments in the public space. And of course it’s supposed to be a delight for the eye in the cold winter months.

While we work out the budget and negotiate with the city about its placement, we are fine-tuning our design for the tower. We are particularly working with a lighting technician and a scaffolding builder who are going to be those chiefly responsible for the construction and the impact.

Go to the website of the Amsterdam Light Festival for more information.

2 X Bank Giro Lottery

Two instances this week of how relevant the national (Dutch) Bank Giro Lottery is to hard-working museum designers:  first, Museum Boerhaave in Leiden received a €600,000 grant from the lottery funds for 2013 thanks to a proposal partially sweetened with designs by Todd van Hulzen, and secondly, a kick-off for the 2014 round of grants by the National Fortification Museum in Naarden for which Todd van Hulzen will also do the preliminary designs.  In the current climate of spending cuts in the cultural sector museums have to appeal to grant givers. To do this they need to have a sound proposal, and that’s where our design work comes in.

Director Dirk van Delft holding a check from the Bankgiro Loterij.

Museum Boerhaave.  In early 2012 we teamed up with Museum Boerhaave and Studio Louter to create a grant proposal to help fund the museum’s new renovation and exhibit plans. We created a sexy, if provisional, design for the interior of the new permanent exhibit on the lower floor.  Now that the money is in, Museum Boerhaave will undergo a new round of tendering to see who will actually execute the project.  We will certainly lobby for ourselves, and we rate our chances as good. Continue reading