Amsterdam Light Festival 2014-15

Amsterdam Light Festival 2014-15 This year’s edition of the Amsterdam Light Festival will include another work by Todd van Hulzen and Studio Louter.  This year we’ve created a projection on the round surface of Renzo Piano’s NEMO Science Center, which people also call the “bow”, as in ship’s bow.

The objective was to make a sliding graphic for a beamer that projects through rolls of acetate, something like a cross between a conventional slide projector and a film roll.  The result is an analog scrolling animation. We did the work on invitation from NEMO itself and were supplied with a projector from the vendor Pani.  We were asked to make a design that was relevant somehow to the current exhibition “Wereld van Vormen”, an exhibit on the subject of mathematics and geometry. Since we were the ones to actually do the design of that show, it all just kind of fell into place. Although, not without due effort.

The concept is that the world can be broken down into mathematical elements and pure shapes.  We’ve chosen to create an abstraction of the city, in particular a city like Amsterdam.  There are some bridges and stepped gables, and at the end the buildings pull out of frame and reveal the piles upon which they are built.

See this fantastic time-lapse film of the festival.  Our project is at 1:01.
 

Amsterdam GVB Streetcar now rolling with our designs on it.

With all the commotion around the opening of “Temporal Tower” we almost forgot that there was an Amsterdam tram (streetcar) of the GVB (Municipal Transport Company) about to roll out with our name on it. And sure enough, there she is.  Dirk Bertels of Studio Louter and Todd van Hulzen worked together on the concept, which is part of the marketing and sponsorship between the GVB and the Amsterdam Light Festival. But Dirk did all of the actual hard work, Todd just stood back and watched and gave self-evident advice. What looks like a white sticker is actually light-reflective film that lights up when directly lit by traffic lights. We settled on light-reflective film after a long search for materials, from glow-in-the-dark to holographic foil. Now that it’s going to be on the rails, we are curious to see if it will make an impression. But our names are printed on it, and that’s what we’re the most proud of. On the rear is a section of illustration dedicated to the Temporal Tower. You can see the scaffolding. Let us know if you see it around.

The Haringpakkerstoren “rebuilt” in scaffolding and light

compositeWe can’t describe how giddy and proud we are of our new big baby, the impressive reconstruction of the historic Haringpakkerstoren (Herring Packers’ Tower).  Of course our tower is not made of masonry and wood, but of scaffolding, mesh, and most importantly, light.  30 meters high (100 feet), the tower, which we call “Temporal Tower” rises up along the quays of the old harbor of Amsterdam, adjacent to the Central Station and is lit by 36 LED arrays dispersed around the spire.  The light is very gradually animated in something of a churning cycle of one color group.  Each week we will change the color scheme and configuration.  For more information on the history of this tower, the original of which was demolished in 1829, see some of the entries below.  For now we just want to publish some of the most recent photo’s of this little giant. There are more to come, as the project is getting quite a lot of media attention. Continue reading

The Making of “Temporal Tower”

Here are some pictures of our tower project in the making.  The first step was agreeing on a budget and a technical design, which we ploddingly accomplished with our world-class international scaffolder StageCo.  Then with the help of a crane, postponed several days due to a fierce storm, we hoisted the sections which we had built at street level into position.  After that came the mesh wrap.  We were already pretty charmed by the pictures of the tower with only scaffolding and no wrapping.  Now the story is complete, but we secretly long for the purity of the scaffolding on its own.  What do you thinnk?

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And here is a video interview I did, explaining the concept in the early stages:

 

Archival Material on Hendrick de Keyser

For our current project for the Amsterdam Light Festival we are recreating —after a fashion—one of the vanished renaissance clock-towers of Hendrick de Keyser: the Haringpakkerstoren.  One of the foundation principles of the project is the knowledge that De Keyser is under-appreciated and deserves to be brought into the limelight, as it were. Never the less there is a decent amount of archival material available, either in the image-bank at the Amsterdam city archives (Beeldbank Stadsarchief) or in other archives around Europe.  We’ve found detailed construction plans, paintings from various eras and biographical information on De Keyser himself.  Here’s a collection of things we’ve found, mostly pertaining to the Haringpakkerstoren.   Enjoy.

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Telegraaf devotes article to Temporal Tower

 

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“American Light Artist” is what the national daily De Telegraaf called Todd van Hulzen. The newspaper is above all interested in the political aspect of the project, which touches on a sensitive subject for the city. In 2005 plans to rebuild the original Haringpakkerstoren (Herring packers tower) were scuttled when the monuments commission declared that the project was theoretically unsound (read: nostalgic) and possibly put the city’s eligibility in danger for its appellation as a UNESCO World Heritage site. This in spite of the fact that the funds to rebuild the tower had already been secured, and that it was a gift to the city from the Foundation Stadsherstel.
Former borough commissioner Guido Frankfurther said “Maak je borst maar nat”, which means, prepare yourself, referring to a lot of anticipated publicity.

Amsterdam Light Festival: Todd van Hulzen creates “Temporal Tower”

TemporalTower2_ToddvanHulzen_copyrightA lot has happened in the last few months, and we’ve been missing the chance to update. One of the most significant things is the fact that Todd van Hulzen was selected, with Studio Louter, to produce their concept for the Amsterdam Light Festival. This is a new annual festival of light art in the capital and we’ve come up with a plan that was compelling enough that it came out on top of the jury’s selection list. It’s called Temporal Tower, and it’s both and homage to one of the vanished clock-towers of the Amsterdam architect Hendrik de Keyser, and also an exploration of the place of monuments in the public space. And of course it’s supposed to be a delight for the eye in the cold winter months.

While we work out the budget and negotiate with the city about its placement, we are fine-tuning our design for the tower. We are particularly working with a lighting technician and a scaffolding builder who are going to be those chiefly responsible for the construction and the impact.

Go to the website of the Amsterdam Light Festival for more information.